Rebecca Coons – Biofuels Digest http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest The world's most widely-read advanced bioeconomy daily Sat, 21 Sep 2019 21:41:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.11 Thailand boosts biodiesel minimum blending slightly to help absorb palm oil surplus http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2018/11/05/thailand-boosts-biodiesel-minimum-blending-slightly-to-help-absorb-palm-oil-surplus/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 23:01:08 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=98687

In Thailand, the Bangkok Post reports that although the country hasn’t managed to get approval yet for B10 to help absorb its palm oil surplus, the energy ministry has been able to make minor changes to the B7 mandate that will boost demand by 62,000 metric tons per year. The surplus is currently 80,000 tons. The current range of blending is between 6.6%-7% but now the minimum will be raised to 6.8%. In two months, the minimum is expected to rise again to 6.9%.

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Agrivida closes $20.4-million funding round  http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2016/09/11/agrivida-closes-20-4-million-funding-round/ Sun, 11 Sep 2016 19:47:48 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=67279

Agritech company Agrivida has raised $20.4 million in a Series E funding that will be used to commercialize its Grainzyme feed enzyme for poultry and swine as well as develop the product for use in dairy and beef cattle.

According to Spencer Swayze of the University of Texas Investment Management Company, which led the round, Grainzyme has the potential to improve production efficiency while reducing raw material and energy costs in the growing feed enzyme market.

Previous investors Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, ARCH Venture Partners, Cultivian Sandbox, Middleland Capital, and Northgate Capital also jointed the round.

Agrivida’s Grainzyme process uses protein expression and storage in grain to simplify enzyme production. The company expects to commercialize Grainzyme in 2017. It will be the company’s first feed enzyme product.

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Green Biologics, Acme Hardesty target 100% biobased esters  http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2016/09/11/green-biologics-acme-hardesty-target-100-biobased-esters/ Sun, 11 Sep 2016 19:47:02 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=67276

Green Biologics and Acme Hardesty are extending their distribution relationship in n-butanol and acetone into a joint development agreement for 100% biobased esters.

Under the terms of the agreement, Green Biologics will supply biobased n-butanol and isopropyl alcohol—produced from renewable acetone—from its plant in Little Falls, Minnesota. Acme Hardesty, a leading supplier of biobased chemicals, will source the acids and oils needed to produce the esters, which will include isopropyl myristate, isopropyl palmitate, butyl myristate, butyl palmitate, butyl stearate, butyl oleate, and dibutyl sebacate. Other high-value esters may be added in the future.

The companies intend to initially target the personal care market. Acme Hardesty will be responsible for product marketing, but the companies will also jointly target other industrial sectors, including lubricants, plastics, and specialty solvents.

The two companies first linked up in April, when Green Biologics tapped Acme to distribute renewable n-butanol and acetone produced at Green Biologics’ Little Falls plant. The facility is in the late stages of construction and set to begin shipments in the fourth quarter.

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Predictive modeling yields promising bioplastics catalyst http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2016/09/02/predictive-modeling-yields-promising-bioplastics-catalyst/ Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:51:24 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=67029

Combining predictive modeling and experimental lab work, researchers from IBM Research and Stanford University say they were able to design a catalyst that enables cheaper biodegradable plastics from plants.

The high cost of biodegradable plastics compared to petroleum-derived counterparts is a major impediment to their wider use in disposable goods such as plastic utensils. Unlike current methods of converting plants into biodegradable plastics, the new catalyst is organic and does not impart heavy metals into the plastic, facilitating decomposition.

Xiangyi Zhang, a graduate student working in Stanford University’s chemistry department, says the “tag-team” approach between predictive modeling and experimental lab work by IBM Research and Stanford University took a lot of the “guess work” out of the process and helped accelerate the materials discover process. The work was recently published in Nature Chemistry.

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Eco-friendly cleaning brand taps Braskem bioplastic for detergent bottles http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2016/09/02/eco-friendly-cleaning-brand-taps-braskem-bioplastic-for-detergent-bottles/ Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:49:53 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=67025

Natural cleaning products brand Seventh Generation is using biobased polyethylene produced by Braskem in its 100-oz laundry detergent bottles. The bottles are now 80% recycled high-density polyethylene, 17% biobased polyethylene, and 3% colorant. The biobased portion replaces virgin, petroleum-based polyethylene.

Derrick Lawrence, Seventh Generation Director of Packaging Development, tells Greener Package that incorporating more than 80% post-consumer recycled polyethylene in its larger bottles has been a challenge. “Our 100-ounce laundry bottle was one of our few remaining bottles under 100% and one of our largest contributors in total pounds of virgin petroleum plastics,” he adds.  The company is targeting 100% biobased or recycled packaging materials for all its products by 2020. It chose to use Braskem’s biobased polyethylene because a drop-in replacement would minimize manufacturing changes and not contaminate the recycling stream.

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VWR opens new biochemicals manufacturing site in Ohio, replacing five others http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2016/09/02/vwr-opens-new-biochemicals-manufacturing-site-in-ohio-replacing-five-others/ Fri, 02 Sep 2016 20:47:37 +0000 http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/?p=67021

VWR celebrated the official plant opening and a facility tour for city officials and attendees at its new manufacturing site in Solon, Ohio. The 226,000 square foot chemical manufacturing site will replace five of their six locations in the Solon area, helping VWR employees to be more consolidated instead of spread out across the region. VWR hopes this will facilitate collaboration among employees. VWR has been around for 160 years initially supporting the mining and laboratory markets, and has expanded into biopharmaceutical, biotechnology, and industrial markets. They now focus on high purity biochemicals and life science regents. VWR reported sales in excess of $4.3 billion in 2015.

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