Gevo signs supply agreement for alcohol-to-jet fuel with Avfuel

June 21, 2018 |

In Colorado, Gevo announced that it has entered into a long-term agreement to supply its renewable alcohol-to-jet fuel (ATJ) to Avfuel Corporation, effective July 1, 2018. Avfuel is a leading global supplier of aviation fuel and services to all industry consumer groups, servicing more than 3,000 locations worldwide. The Supply Agreement with Avfuel is Gevo’s first long-term commercial supply agreement for its ATJ.

The Supply Agreement contemplates two phases. During the first phase, Gevo will supply Avfuel from its smaller-scale hydrocarbon processing facility it operates in Silsbee, Texas, in partnership with South Hampton Resources, Inc. Currently, the Silsbee Facility has the capacity to produce approximately 70,000 gallons of renewable hydrocarbon products per year (50% of which is ATJ and 50% of which is isooctane).

During the first phase, Gevo expects to construct a larger-scale hydrocarbon facility at its existing ethanol and isobutanol production facility located in Luverne, Minnesota, to produce larger quantities of ATJ, subject to Gevo’s receipt of sufficient financing. Upon completion of the Luverne Hydrocarbon Facility, the second phase of the Supply Agreement would commence, which would have a term of five years, subject to extension upon the mutual agreement of the parties. During the second phase, Gevo would supply Avfuel with larger volumes of ATJ, ramping up to 1,000,000 gallons of unblended ATJ per year, which, when blended with conventional jet fuel, would produce many millions of gallons of finished ASTM D1655 jet-fuel product for distribution per year.

With further regard to the environment, for every one million gallons of ATJ produced, approximately 20 million pounds of animal feed and protein would also be produced and sold into the food chain. To produce ATJ, Gevo fractionates grain to produce protein and animal feed while using the residual carbohydrate portion of the grain for fermentation to produce the intermediate chemical: isobutanol. The isobutanol is then chemically transformed using a hydrocarbon processing facility into ATJ meeting ASTM D7566 (standard specification for aviation turbine fuel containing synthesized hydrocarbons). The ATJ made by this process has very low sulfur, low particulates, and higher energy density than petro-based jet fuel.

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